Dating aynsley marks

This blue mark was based on the old second mark but due to its small size and difficulty in firing it successfully, it was decided to replace it in 1997 with a second blue mark larger and with a new representation of the Wolfhound, Round Tower and Harp.In 2000 Belleek celebrated the Millennium by issuing a black trademark for that year only.There were a lot of problems with the first blue mark with parts of the mark burning off during firing.This resulted in a lot of pieces having to be re-fired with obvious added costs.It differed from the older black stamps with a banner saying "Millennium 2000" A green mark was introduced in 2001, using a darker colour of green based on Belleek’s corporate green.In 2007 Belleek celebrated its 150th anniversary and to mark that occasion a special black stamp was issued to commemorate the year.They also used to types of this one with the words "IRELAND" and one with EST 1857, under the word Belleek.

Although the original plan was to replace the trademark every ten years after 1980, this did not work out and the next new mark did not come into place until 1993!The mark is identical to its predecessor in every way except the colour. A capital "R" in a circle was added in 1955 to signify that the trademark had been registered in the United States.The additional mark is placed immediately above the right hand tip of the banner with the words "CO FERMANAGH IRELAND" the mark is Green. The size of the mark was reduced in 1965 probably to accommodate placing stamps on smaller pieces. In April 1980 the seventh mark was introduced to commemorate the centenary of Gold medal won at the Melbourne Exhibition of 1880.Although it is not definite why this occurred, it is likely that this product was made during the First World War when materials were difficult to acquire and inferior materials were used. Introduced in 1926, possibly to mark the Wembley Exhibition of that year. Interestingly this registry mark dates from 1884 but was only used from 1926! Around scroll with Celtic decoration and the words "deanta in eireann" (made in Ireland) added.On Earthenware the stamp Belleek changed to "Melvin Ware" in 1936 probably to distinguish it from the more prestigious Parian China. The Pottery resumed full production in 1946 In tests carried out on backstamps, green was felt to be less obtrusive than black at showing through the translucent China and thus it was decided to change the colour from black to green.

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